Posted by TAG - November 6, 2012 | News




The “John B. Caddell,” a tanker ship, run aground by Hurricane Sandy in the Clifton section of Staten Island.
(Photo: Thomas Altfather Good / NLN)

 

NEW YORK — November 6, 2012. Global climate change increased the power and fury of Hurricane Sandy, according to Environmental Defense Fund Chief Scientist Steve Hamburg.

 




A tree falls in Brooklyn…
(Photo: Ed Hedemann / NLN)

 
The EDF is a non-profit which “Takes on the most urgent environmental threats to the climate, oceans, ecosystems and people’s health,” according to its website. Hamburg said global warming affects the ocean waters, changes in the moisture of the atmosphere and changing energy patterns — as warming in the artic affects patterns of cold air in the atmosphere. In turn, all of these factors made Sandy a more powerful storm, but Hamburg said Sandy wasn’t caused by climate change.

 




Manhattan under water.
(Photo courtesy of Daniel Millstone and Frank Mullen)

 
“We could see more of this in the future,” Hamburg said. “If you look at the characteristics of this storm, it’s what the climate research community has said will happen.”

 




Wall Street before the storm.
(Photo: Nigel French / NLN)

 
Ceres Spokesperson Peyton Fleming said the losses for the insurance industry add up to approximately $20 billion dollars. Ceres is an organization that mobilizes members of the business and investor community to “expand the adoption of sustainable business practices and solutions to build a healthy economy,” according to its website.




Staten Islanders waiting on line for gas to power their generators.
(Photo: Thomas Altfather Good / NLN)

 
“The estimates on the losses are double what they were a few days ago,” Fleming said. “But the broader economic impact is around $50 billion dollars.”




A police officer confronting an SUV driver – on the wrong side of the road.
(Photo: Thomas Altfather Good / NLN)

 
Fleming said the damage from storms like Sandy could impact insurance consumers across the board in higher insurance premiums.

 




The Hudson River during the storm.
(Photo: Nigel French / NLN)

 


View Photos From Hurricane Sandy